Shackleton’s Incredible Voyage

Ernest Shackleton was an Anglo-Irish Antarctic explorer who planned to cross the Antarctic from sea-to-sea, and instead he and his crew of 28 men became trapped in pack ice. I just finished listening to Endurance by Alfred Lansing and read by Tim Pigott-Smith. This author retells the story of the incredible voyage of these men through extreme weather conditions over a period of 21 months during which none perished.

Recommendation: Fall of Civilizations

For the last few weeks I have been listening religiously to the Fall of Civilizations Podcast which I discovered also has this same podcast in a YouTube video version. I’m likely to go back and watch all these videos when I have a chance, because the story Paul Cooper (@PaulMMCooper) tells is clear, detailed and illustrated with relevant pictures of artifacts, and readings from the period and from the people who discovered the ruins. I explain here why this is such a great podcast.

A Novel Perspective of World History

I just finished listening to the Audible version of The Silk Roads: A New History of the World by Peter Frankopan. The author gave me much more than simply another world history. He provided a perspective of world history that considers Central Asia at the center rather than the usual focus on Western Europe. This blog mentions some of my insights as a result of reading this book.

Failure of American Civil War and Reconstruction

After reading The Black Calhouns I wanted to list all the violations of Constitutional rights that have been brought upon blacks since the end of the Civil War. My list ends around the approval of the Civil Rights Act of 1965, but blacks continue to experience racist behavior, lynchings, police killings, etc. I want to communicate why we must act to make amends and give restitution.

History of Sicily – Land of My Ancestors

I thought it would be interesting to learn a little about the history of the land of my paternal ancestors, Sicily. For my first reading I picked a book called Sicily: The History and Legacy of the Mediterranean’s Most Famous Island by Charles River Editors. In this blog I write about the various important points in Sicilian history from 3.3 million years ago through early settlement to Ancient Greek and Roman times, and through changes from Arab to Norman to German to Spaniard to Angevin to Bourbon to Italian unification and finally to the development of the mafia. Showing the connection to migration that occurred mostly in the late 19th century.